Conference 2018: Saturday 24 sessions

08.30 – 09.30  Warm up

Safe in Dance International Warm up and Cool Down (open class)
Charlotte Tomlinson 

This open class will be a relaxed yet fun flowing contemporary dance class. It will take you through a gradual warm up, waking you up and preparing you for your dance conference day ahead, finishing with a calming cool down, aiming to leave you revived and ready to go!


Introduction to 
Language of Dance and the Inclusive Level 1 Award
Valerie Farrant – Language of Dance Centre 

This is a practical session, which will serve as an introduction to the Language of Dance Approach to Movement. It will begin with a warm-up, followed by a guided exploration focussing on the elements of movement, an introduction to eight symbols and the chance to choreograph a phrase of movement. You will have the opportunity to learn more about our funded teacher training programme for the inclusive Level 1 Award in Language of Dance Movement Exploration and you can also visit the Language of Dance stand for more information.


Toolkit: 
Smartabase Workshop
Smartabase and Adam Mattiussi   

The objective of this session is to give participants an introduction into how Smartabase feels to both the healthcare practitioner and the dancer. This session will lead on from the previous day’s discussions allowing participants to understand the journey from data entry to visualisation, as well as the inner workings of how this is achieved.


10.00 – 11.3Keynotes and World Café

Keynotes

Michael Ellis MPMinister for Arts, Heritage and Tourism
The Dance Sector today.  Valuing the contribution of everyone involved in the sector working hard to make the UK an innovator and leader in dance, and recognising the importance of investment and education to support its success.

Claire Nicholson Principal, CAPA college  

What is the place of dance in the current educational climate? The decline of dance in mainstream education is a hot topic. Many working in dance education talk of a ‘crisis’ caused by a focus on the EBACC and other performance measures. The Cultural Learning Alliance report that the number of GCSE Dance entries fell by 45% between 2010 and 2018.

So is it all doom and gloom? Ofsted recently announced its shift to focus on ‘broad curriculum and quality experiences’ – could this be a glimmer of light on the horizon? As we continue to fight and advocate for the place of dance within education, what do we do in the meantime to inspire this generation of young people? How do we preserve quality of provision – even if the quantity of our offer is being squeezed?

World Café

Provocation 1: What makes a strong dancer?
Sharon Watson 

Sharon Watson, Artistic Director of Phoenix Dance Theatre explores the different qualities and attitudes that she has discovered make a strong dancer during her tenure as Phoenix’s Artistic Director, choreographer and from her time spent as a professional dancer. Sharon regularly auditions dancers for Phoenix and gets hundreds of applicants from the UK and overseas with her company dancers being recognised by some of the most prestigious dance publications and awards in the world. Sharon knows what makes a strong dancer with many of her company dancers maturing during their time with the company from dancer to award-winning choreographer.

Provocation 2: Developing a more inclusive dance leadership
Hannah Robertshaw 

This provocation will challenge how we think about inclusion and ask us to consider whether we are doing enough to support dancers with a learning disability or autism to develop as independent artists, facilitators and leaders?


12.00 – 13.30 Breakout Sessions One


Toolkit: Dance
 as a tool for learning in Key Stage 1 and 2
Emma Bellerby 

Dance can do so much more than teach children how to replicate steps to music, it can bring the curriculum alive and inspire lessons that stay with children throughout their education. Whether you are a primary school teacher or a dance specialist, this session will explore how creative movement can be used as a tool for learning alongside classroom work. Through different exercises exploring how to structure a dance unit around a classroom topic, participants will cover a range of fresh, creative approaches to primary dance that can be taught well with any level of dance experience. Using several activities that can be adapted to different themes, we will move away from prescribed routines and focus on creative movement, improvisation and choreography in KS1 and KS2.


GCSE
 Dance Anthology – Shadows rep with Phoenix Dance Theatre
Natalie Alleston and Antonio Borriello – Phoenix Dance Theatre 

This is a practical session beginning with a general warm up before looking at repertoire directly from Christopher Bruce’s Shadows. The dancers will be able to demonstrate key phrases as well as break them down for delegates to learn to then relay them to their own groups. There will be time to discuss the work, introducing the choreographic themes and intension within the piece and how this is portrayed through the movement within the roles of the different characters.


Leading the diversity 
conversation
Nike Jonah and Hassan Mahamdallie 

Hassan Mahamdallie, author of Arts Council England’s Creative Case for Diversity and Equality in the Arts. Creative Director, Nike Jonah will take participants through the relationship between dance, diversity and equality in the UK today and how it can be strengthened.  The session will consist of an illustrated introduction, specific case studies, a short break-out session for participants and general discussion. Participants should expect some theory, historical examples and practical suggestions on how the embed diversity and equality at the heart of their creative work.


The art of scheduling in dance training and 
peformance
Gaby Allard, Matt Wyon, Derrick Brown, Martin Hargreaves and Phil Mosley 

The ability to adapt and self-manage is at the core of periodisation, an approach to planning and training used in elite sport to prepare athletes for optimal performance. A periodised training programme is designed to diminish potential training overload, focussing on training outcomes rather than training as a target in itself. Allard and Wyon present why and how they are collaborating using (applied) science in order to optimize learning and enter into conversation with delegates and panellists from London Contemporary Dance School and The Royal Ballet to uncover and reflect on potential solutions to the complexities of scheduling with a view to optimising performance as well as physical, social and mental wellbeing.


Transitioning into Leadership

Dancers Career Development (DCD) 

Join this practical and inspirational session exploring the needs, challenges and best practice in supporting dancers’ transition to a post-performance career. Hear from experts in dancer career transition, Dancers’ Career Development (DCD) and leading dance artists.  DCD has supported over 2,500 dancers in over 40 years, succeeding in a range of diverse careers. For professional dancers, the path to a new career is paved with physical, emotional and financial challenges. This session will discuss trends and how best employers, companies and support organisations can support a dancer’s life long career. The session will also include practical exercises, exploring the journey of a dancer’s career, sharing tools to develop a personal action plan and guidance on how to manage a lifelong career beyond performance.


Research Presentations
Facilitated by Dr Kerry Chappell, Dr Angela Pickard and Veronica Jobbins

This session features research by dance teachers and education professionals. Focusing on children and young people’s dance education and community practice, we invited proposals for research-led presentations that address (but were not limited to) at least one of the following areas:

  • Dance leadership skills within education and community settings
  • Inclusive dance practice
  • Benefits of dance for children and young people in educational and community settings
  • The session will represent a mix of researchers at different points in their careers.

The titles in this first session are:

  • Primary Dance and Literacy
    Dr. Kyriaki Makopoulou, Sophie Barraclough and Sandra Rautavuori of University of Birmingham
  • Benefits of dance for children and young people in education and community settings
    Charlotte Tomlinson and Emily Ruth Sutton
  • Pathways to dance for young disabled people
    Dr Imogen Aujla of University of Bedfordshire

(Note: we welcomed contributions that counter the current STEM focus in the school curriculum).


15.00 – 17.00 Breakout Sessions Two


Toolkit: Fitness for Performance – the application of strength and conditioning to dance training
Nico Kolokythas, Seema Chopra and Nicola Stephens, MSc, MCSP, MMACP 

This session will focus on the importance of supplementary training in the different dance genres and discuss the common myths associated with strength and conditioning. The speakers will present the current status of these concepts in south Asian dance, musical theatre and ballet. This will be a practical interactive workshop demonstrating best practice guided by research.

In this workshop you will learn about the injuries that these three genres have in common, in particular the ankle, knee and hip and you will take home some practical solutions and resources for future use.


Toolkit: Inclusive Dance Practice and Choreography with TIN Arts
Tess Chaytor, Tertia Brigham and Martin Wilson 

This session covers the principles of inclusive and choreographic practice through practical participation. The session will include three main activities:

  1. Preparing together – methods to enable participants to be informed and prepared ahead of the session, relieving anxiety and ensuring a positive start to the session for all
  2. Starting off – Inclusive warm-ups and technique class
  3. Making the creative process accessible- varying ways to create new material


Supporting potential at audition (and beyond) – physical, nutritional and psychological assessment
Kim Hutt and Karen Sheriff  

This session aims to explore a holistic approach to the screening process for dancers at audition stage and once accepted or ‘post hire’. This will be informed by the vocational training perspective but will also be of relevance to professionals. An interactive session underpinned by evidence-based practice and using practical examples of physical screening, this session will also reflect on the wider information gleaned during the screening process and how this information is presented to and considered by audition panels and to inform training. Participants are invited to offer suggestions throughout


GCSE Dance Anthology – Dance Companies in conversation with AQA and 
Ofqual
Mel Knott, Sandra Allan, Julia Fitzelle, Jasmine Wilson, Amy McGann, Shawab Iqbal, Kellie Brown, Antonio Borriello and Charis Charles

An opportunity for teachers of GCSE Dance to meet with representatives from Ofqual and AQA plus companies featured in the Anthology – Boy Blue, Wayne McGregor, Phoenix and Rambert. This is a collaborative and interactive session, with the opportunity for a two-way dialogue between teachers and the panel to explore support, resources and development needs.


Does Touring Work?
Sheila Creevey, Joe Bates, Georgia Geary, Grace Okereke 

This will be a working session that will surface the stories of touring dance across the UK, provide a space to encourage participants to reflect on their own practice, and engage in peer to peer discussion to move towards answering this key question “Does Touring Work?” with agency and co-responsibility. This session will be facilitated by Sheila Creevey, (Head of Performance, PDSW and Surf The Wave Project Director) with guest contributors from touring, producing and venue programming backgrounds.

 

Research Presentations
Facilitated by Dr Angela Pickard and Veronica Jobbins

This session features research by dance teachers and education professionals. Focusing on children and young people’s dance education and community practice, we invited proposals for research-led presentations that address (but were not limited to) at least one of the following areas:

  • Dance leadership skills within education and community settings
  • Inclusive dance practice
  • Benefits of dance for children and young people in educational and community settings
  • The session will represent a mix of researchers at different points in their careers.

The titles in this first session are:

  • Creativity and dance education research
    Kerry Chappell and Charlotte Hathway
  • Effect of a one-week dance project on the social interaction between students and teachers in a public school
    Anouk Lehner
  • Dance as a vehicle for learning about health and wellbeing in primary schools
    Jo Rhodes

(Note: we welcomed contributions that counter the current STEM focus in the school curriculum).